Skip to main content
Loading...
Munduk

Munduk

Used by Dutch colonials, as a great location to cool off from sticky summers in Singaraja, Munduk is nowadays the perfect base to explore the North from. Though a rather unassuming mountain retreat, its waterfalls are better than some of its more famous competitors and its trekking potential is unmatched almost anywhere else on the island. Whether you want to check out coffee plantations, orchards, springs, cloves, rivers or temples, Munduk, though definitively in the north, feels like the real heartland of Bali. Don’t forget to pay a visit to the Terrasse du Lac where the views and food are gorgeous, or the village of Gesing – pretty in and of itself – but which, more importantly, boasts one of the island’s largest and oldest Banyan trees – considered holy by the Balinese.
LOVINA & SINGARAJA

LOVINA & SINGARAJA

Lovina is to Singaraja what Sanur is to Denpasar,   a dated resort adjunct to a mediocre urban area. One of the nicest things about these places is, in fact, the getting to them, especially if approaching from the rugged north where visitors cut through a decidedly Arthurian landscape of cold mists, lakes, waterfalls (such as Gitgit) and mountains before a plateau slopes down to the shore and temperatures start to rise again. Even the dolphin-dotted port, once Bali’s main entrepot, seems to have returned to its fisherman origins and the main city has the character of some of Cuba’s more dilapidated places, with all the colonial chic, sure, but usually with the latest Top 40 pumping out rather than Bona Vista Social Club or some gamelan vibes.
Kintamani

Kintamani

Avoid taking any shortcuts,   they will all break either your axle or your bones, as you ascend to the mountainous region that stretches itself between Mount Batukaru and Agung. It’s noticeably rainier here, as well as cooler, and there’s a strong contingent of Muslims to boot. Standing on the roadside from the centre of Penelokan right down to the lake, the women flog sweetcorn off their heads and those at stalls ply thirsty visitors with sweet es doger full of candied fruits and tapioca pearls. The lake itself bizarrely resembles a Scottish loch transplanted on to Bali and though result is intense, there’s an inescapable sense of anti-climax that’s hard to justify in words – perhaps it’s because there’s no restaurant life down there.
Subscribe to North